Fritz Bleicher

Born: Vienna, Austria, 30 December 1910

Profession in country of origin: Furrier

Arrived in Britain as a refugee from Austria on 5 June 1939

Documents

Male enemy alien - Exemption from internment - Refugee                           

Surname: Bleicher

Forename: Fritz

Alias: -

Date and place of birth: 30/12/1910 in Vienna

Nationality: German

Police Regn. Cert. No.: 712 520

Home Office ref: C 2004  

Address: Kitchener camp, Richborough, Sandwich, Kent

Normal occupation: Furrier

Present occupation: Agricultural worker in camp

Name and address of employer: -

Decision of tribunal: Exempted "C" & 9A   Date 12/10/1939

Whether exempted from Article 6(A): Yes

Whether desires to be repatriated: No

Tribunal District: Richborough Camp Tribunal 4

Source: National Arrives, Home Office: Aliens Department: Internees Index, 1939-1947

Editor’s note: We are not allowed to reproduce National Archives (UK) images, but we are permitted to reproduce the material from them, as shown above.

Richborough camp, Fritz Bleicher, Zeugnis, Vienna Police, 6 March 1939
Certificate from the Chief of Police in Vienna granting Fritz Bleicher permission to travel to England

The Police Chief of Vienna
March 6, 1939

Testimony

Fritz Bleicher
Born December 30, 1910 in Vienna
Residing at Praterstrasse 25a, Vienna 

Kindly translated by a Kitchener descendant

Letters

  • Richborough transit camp, Fritz Bleicher, Postcard to Kitchener, front
  • Richborough transit camp, Fritz Bleicher, Postcard to Kitchener, 14 June 1939

Memories

Fritz Bleicher (changed his name to Fred in 1945 when he became a US citizen).

Fritz was born on 30th December 1910.

He was a furrier (Kurschner).

Fritz arrived at Dover on 5th June, 1939, and left Kitchener camp in March 1940.

He then immigrated to America and married Herta Naginsky, a Viennese refugee, in 1942. He became a US citizen in 1945, and had his name changed to Fred. Fred and Herta lived in the Washington DC area and worked at the well-known Woodward and Lothrup department store.

They enjoyed listening to classical records and exploring Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains, grateful to be living a life that was so different from the dangers fate had presented them.

Fred died of cancer in 1963 when I was 10 years old. He was taken to St Paul, Minnesota, for burial.

Herta moved to St Paul to be with her sister Lola and her brother-in-law Oskar Schreiner.

Herta and Lola had fled Vienna in October 1939. Their parents emigrated from Vienna to St Paul in March 1939.

My father, Oskar, was arrested on Kristallnacht.

Oskar Schreiner, Postcard, Dachau, 9 November 1939
Oskar Schreiner, Postcard, Dachau, 9 November 1939

He went from Dachau to Sedge Fen, England, then to Huyton near Liverpool, then to the Isle of Man, and then to an internment camp in Quebec, Canada. Finally, he came to Minnesota.

Oskar was interviewed for the USC Shoah Foundation project.

Kindly submitted by Irwin Schreiner – Fritz Bleicher’s nephew
Oskar Schreiner, Reference, Chivers and Sons Ltd, 2 January 1943
Oskar Schreiner, Reference, Chivers and Sons Ltd, 2 January 1943

Photographs

Richborough camp, Hut 22, Fritz Bleicher, 1939
Kitchener camp, Hut 22, Fritz Bleicher, 1939
Fritz Bleicher, Furrier store in Vienna, 1938
Fritz Bleicher, Furrier store in Vienna, 1938.
The store shown above was owned by Fritz’s father Abraham Bleicher who died in 1938.
According to family letters, Fritz’s mother Adele died in 1941 in a concentration camp in Riga, Latvia